Take a closer look at OCREVUS for relapsing MS:

We invite you to learn more about why OCREVUS may be the right choice for treating your relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS).

Reductions in relapses

Shown to slow disability progression

Impacts brain lesions on MRIs

Additional data in OCREVUS clinical studies

Have fewer maybes

Proven superior reductions in relapses

OCREVUS cut relapses nearly in half in 2 clinical studies across 2 years

More people taking OCREVUS had no relapses compared with REBIF in 2 clinical studies across 2 years

*REBIF® is a registered trademark of EMD Serono, Inc.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about OCREVUS?

OCREVUS can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Infusion reactions: OCREVUS can cause infusion reactions that can be serious and require you to be hospitalized.  You will be monitored during your infusion and for at least 1 hour after each infusion of OCREVUS for signs and symptoms of an infusion reaction. Tell your healthcare provider or nurse if you get any of these symptoms: 
    • itchy skin
    • rash
    • hives
    • tiredness
    • coughing or wheezing
    • trouble breathing
    • throat irritation or pain
    • feeling faint
    • fever
    • redness on your face (flushing)
    • nausea
    • headache
    • swelling of the throat
    • dizziness
    • shortness of breath
    • fatigue
    • fast heart beat

These infusion reactions can happen for up to 24 hours after your infusion. It is important that you call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the signs or symptoms listed above after each infusion.

If you get infusion reactions, your healthcare provider may need to stop or slow down the rate of your infusion.

Have fewer maybes

Proven to slow disability progression

OCREVUS was better at slowing disability progression compared with REBIF across 2 years

Disability progression was measured using a tool called the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Disability progression was confirmed 3 months after the initial neurological change.
Disability progression was also confirmed after 6 months.
§Disability improvement was also measured using the EDSS and was confirmed after 3 months.

Have fewer maybes

Proven to significantly impact brain lesions on MRIs

OCREVUS was consistently proven superior at reducing T1 lesions compared with REBIF across 2 clinical studies

The average number of T1 Gd+ lesions per MRI was lower for OCREVUS:

  • Study 1: 0.016 lesions with OCREVUS compared with 0.286 lesions with REBIF
  • Study 2: 0.021 lesions with OCREVUS compared with 0.416 lesions with REBIF

T1 gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions.
#The exact way OCREVUS works is not fully known.

OCREVUS had a consistently superior effect on T2 lesions** compared with REBIF in the same studies

The average number of new or enlarging T2 lesions per MRI was lower for OCREVUS:

  • Study 1: 0.323 lesions with OCREVUS compared with 1.413 lesions with REBIF
  • Study 2: 0.325 lesions with OCREVUS compared with 1.904 lesions with REBIF

**T2 hyperintense lesions.

Lesions in MS
  • T1 Gd+ lesions are thought to be a sign of active inflammation
  • T2 hyperintense lesions may reflect new inflammation or older, chronic lesions (which are a sign of scarring from previous MS activity)

Additional data in the OCREVUS clinical studies

Another outcome called NEDA was measured in the OCREVUS studies

The results listed below for NEDA in the OCREVUS clinical studies did not achieve statistical significance. This means that the studies did not prove whether the results for NEDA were due to treatment with OCREVUS or happened by chance. Therefore, no definite conclusions can be arrived at from these results.

In 2 clinical studies over 2 years

  • Study 1: 48% of people taking OCREVUS had no evidence of disease activity compared with 29% with REBIF
  • Study 2: 48% of people taking OCREVUS had no evidence of disease activity compared with 25% with REBIF

Relapsing MS: Thinking about your treatment options?

Download an education kit that can help you talk to your doctor about OCREVUS for relapsing MS.

Talk to your doctor about OCREVUS

Discover information and resources that can help you make the most of your next doctor's appointment.

Hear from a neurologist

Get an expert perspective. Watch Dr. Barry Hendin discuss OCREVUS and hear from patients on treatment.